Whole Abdomen Ultrasound

 

Information regarding Ultrasound (USG) Whole Abdomen, Lower Abdomen, Upper Abdomen, and Pelvis scan is outlined below. To view the price list of whole abdomen ultrasound and other scans, please visit our Ultrasound Rate List.

To Book an Appointment for USG Whole Abdomen, call us at 011-27942166 or 011-27941155, or fill your contact details here.

 

What is an Abdomen Ultrasound?

Abdomen Ultrasound Scan and Color Doppler investigations

Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to capture images and video of the inside of the body, in real time. Although generally associated with being used during pregnancy, an ultrasound is used to examine many other parts of the body.

Abdominal ultrasounds are used to check the major organs in the abdominal cavity, including gallbladder, kidneys, liver, pancreas, and spleen.

 

 

Why is an abdominal ultrasound performed?

Abdominal ultrasound scans are performed to rule out or diagnose the following conditions:

  • Blood clots
  • Enlarged organs (such as Liver, Spleen, or Kidneys)
  • Fluid in the abdominal cavity
  • Gallstones
  • Pancreatitis
  • Hernia
  • Kidney blockage, or cancer
  • Kidney stones
  • Liver cancer
  • Appendicitis
  • Tumors
  • Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA)

 

Risks of an Ultrasound

An abdominal ultrasound does not have any risks. It is a non-invasive, safe, and painless procedure. Unlike X-Rays or CT scans, ultrasound doesn’t use radiation, which is why doctors prefer to use them to check on developing babies in pregnant women.

 

Preparation Needed Before the Ultrasound Scan

 

Clothing

Wear comfortable and loose-fitting clothing for the examination.

Bladder

Ensure that your bladder is full. It is important to drink lot of water at least one hour before the exam and finishing at least 45 minutes before the test, since the water must be absorbed by the body

Fasting

The majority of the time, fasting is necessary for at least eight hours before any abdominal ultrasound procedure. Air or gas can significantly block the sound waves so fasting reduces obstructions in the form of bowel gas that could interfere with the imaging of the abdominal organs.

There’s an exception to fasting if you’re having an ultrasound of your gallbladder, liver, pancreas, or spleen. In those cases, you may be instructed to eat a fat-free meal the evening before your test, and start fasting after it.

How is an Abdomen Ultrasound performed?

Before an abdominal ultrasound, you will be asked to lie down on a table with your abdomen exposed, and remove any jewellery or other objects that might interfere with the scan.

The radiologist or sonographer will put a special lubricating jelly on your abdomen. The gel prevents air pockets from forming between the skin and the ultrasound transducer (which looks like a microphone). The transducer is moved around to image the various organs under examination, which appear on the monitor and the useful images are saved and interpreted.

Whole Abdomen Ultrasound

 

Ultrasounds are usually not uncomfortable, and you are awake and alert during the procedure. Often the radiologist or technician will discuss what he or she is seeing during the test, but in some instances, you may need to wait to discuss the findings with your doctor.

 

If you’re having pain in your abdomen, you may feel slight discomfort during the ultrasound. Make sure to let your radiologist know right away, if the pain becomes severe.

When the scan is done, the technician will clean the gel off your abdomen. The procedure usually lasts less than 30 minutes.

Reporting and Follow Up

The radiologist will interpret your ultrasound images and provide you with a report. Your doctor will discuss the results with you at a follow-up appointment. Your doctor may ask for another follow-up scan or other tests and set up an appointment to check on any issues that were found in the ultrasound scan.